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This science fair project was conducted to observe how adding salt to water and increasing its temperature can affect the surface tension of water. The experiment was done by adding grains of rice to a piece of aluminum foil floating on water of varying temperatures, i.e. of 15C, 25C, 35C, 45C and 55C.
Difficulty: Elementary school
Sundials are the oldest way to tell time. The position of the sun changes during the day. The sun doesn't move; the Earth rotates around the sun, making it seem like the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. As the sun goes across the sky, the post in the center of the sundial casts a shadow on a circular plate. Marks on the plate tell you what time it is. It's just like reading a clock!
Difficulty: Elementary school
Demonstrate that seasons exist because of the tilt of the earth and its impact on the intensity of the sunlight at a given location.
Difficulty: Elementary school
An Antibubble is similar to a bubble, but the roles of the water and the air are reversed. This experiment shows you the characteristics of an anti-bubble!
Difficulty: Middle school
A hand-held electrophorus can produce significant amounts of charge conveniently and repeatedly. It is operated by first frictionally charging a flat insulating plate called a "cake". In Volta's day, the cake was made of shellac/resin mixtures or a carnauba wax film deposited on glass. Nowadays, excellent substitutes are available. TeflonTM, though a bit expensive, is a good choice because it is a
Difficulty: Elementary school
This simple circuit can detect the invisible fields of voltage which surround all electrified objects. It acts as an electronic "electroscope."
Difficulty: Middle school
The purpose of this experiment was to determine how different temperatures affected the voltage (mV), the current (mA), and the power (watt) generation of a solar cell.
Difficulty: Elementary school
If you appreciate ingenuity, simplicity, and like instant gratification from your radio projects, then you ought to spend a few minutes building your own foxhole radio. Foxhole radios were built by GIs in World War II from materials they had easy access to in the field. They usually consist of just a coil and a detector. They use a point detector, the chief component being an ordinary razo
Difficulty: Elementary school
The purpose of this experiment was to find out which materials block radio waves and thus cause the most interference for remote control devices. The information gained from this experiment will help if someone is using remote control robotics or devices. It may be useful for scientific reasons, remote exploration as well as recreation. This experiment will benefit all those by determining which m
Difficulty: Elementary school
This is an AC electric generator which is capable of lighting up a tiny incandescent light bulb. The generator is made up of a hollow-ended cardboard box with a nail through the center, many turns of copper wire wound around the box, and four larger magnets clamped around the nail. When the nail and magnets are spun fast by hand, the little light bulb lights up dimly.
Difficulty: Middle school
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