Saved science fair projects:

This is a saved copy of the relevant third party website. We save only the first page of every project because we've found that the third party sites are often temporarily down. We do not save all pages of the project because copyright belongs to the third party author.

 

 

The National Student Research Center

E-Journal of Student Research: Social Studies

Volume 6, Number 1, January, 1998


The National Student Research Center is dedicated to promoting student research and the use of the scientific method in all subject areas across the curriculum, especially science and math.



For more information contact:

John I. Swang, Ph.D.
Founder/Director
National Student Research Center
2024 Livingston Street
Mandeville, Louisiana 70448
U.S.A.
E-Mail: nsrcmms@communique.net
http://youth.net/nsrc/nsrc.html



TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. A Survey About Household Hazardous Wastes And Their Disposal
  2. A Student Survey About Iraq
  3. A Survey About Pet Ownership
  4. What Do Students Know And Feel About Prejudice?
  5. What Students Know And Feel About Water Pollution?
  6. What Do Students Know And Feel About Saddam Hussein And Iraq?

TITLE:  A Survey About Household Hazardous Wastes And Their
        Disposal

STUDENT RESEARCHERS:  Joshua Foster, Jack Bell, George
                      McPherson, and John Casey

SCHOOL:  Mandeville Middle School
         Mandeville, Louisiana
GRADE:  6
TEACHER:  John I. Swang, Ph.D.

I.  STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS: 

We would like to do a survey research project on what students 
know and feel about household hazardous waste and its disposal.  
Our hypothesis states that the majority of the responses to the 
factual questions on our questionnaire about household hazardous 
wastes will be correct.

II.  METHODOLOGY:

First, we identified our community problem which was the 
disposal of household hazardous waste.  Then we wrote our 
statement of purpose and conducted a review of the literature 
about household hazardous waste, soap and detergents, toxins, 
recycling, environmental pollution, pesticides, herbicides, 
fungicides, pest and weed control, paint and varnish, 
turpentine, fertilizer, gasoline, environment, and medicine.  We 
also interviewed numerous community officials about the 
recycling and disposing of household hazardous waste (aerosol 
cans, antifreeze, smoke detectors, petroleum based cleaners, 
drain opener, expired prescriptions, furniture and floor polish, 
insecticides, herbicides, pesticides, paints, liquor, mercury, 
motor oil, nail polish and remover, oven cleaner, paint thinner, 
rat poison, rubbing alcohol, shoe polish, kitchen and bathroom 
cleaners, gasoline diesel fuel, kerosene, batteries, swimming 
pool chemicals, brake fluid and/or transmission fluid, bleach, 
ammonia, clothes cleaning materials, wood preservatives, art 
supplies, flea collars, sprays, and/or soap, contact cement, 
fire extinguishers, lighter fluid, moth balls, old propane 
tanks, photographic chemicals, old ammunition, old tires, 
solvents, and asbestos roof shingles or floor tiles).  From our 
review of literature and community interviews we developed our 
hypothesis.

Next, we wrote a methodology to test our hypothesis.  Then we 
developed a questionnaire about household hazardous waste.  The 
questionnaire was given to a random sample of 52 sixth grade 
students in Mandeville, Louisiana, at Mandeville Middle School.  
We also sent this questionnaire out on the Internet to students 
around the world.  When the questionnaires were returned we 
scored them and recorded the responses on a data collection 
sheet.

Then we analyzed our data using simple statistics, charts, and 
graphs.  Next, we wrote our summary and conclusion where we 
accepted/rejected our hypothesis.  Last, we applied our findings 
to our community.

III.  ANALYSIS OF DATA:

Forty-nine students from Mandeville, Louisiana and thirty-two 
from Iowa, Texas, and Massachusetts responded to our survey.  
Students were in grades 3, 5, 6, 11, and 12.  The ten household 
hazardous materials that most respondents have in their homes 
are; in order from most to least, kitchen and bathroom cleaners, 
batteries, art supplies, bleach, paints, nail polish and 
remover, smoke detector, furniture and floor polish, shoe 
polish, and rubbing alcohol.  A majority of 95% of the students 
knew that antifreeze should not be disposed of by pouring it 
down the drain.  A majority of 81% of the students did not know 
that smoke detectors contain radioactive materials.  A majority 
of 97% of the students knew that liquor can be disposed of by 
pouring it down the drain.  A majority of 97% of the students 
did not know that drain opener is explosive.  A majority of 59% 
of the students did not know that furniture and floor polish 
should not be disposed of by throwing it away in the garbage.  A 
majority of 56% of the students knew that smoke detectors should 
not be disposed of by throwing them in the garbage.  A majority 
of 57% of the students knew that 80% of hazardous household 
wastes are disposed of in landfills.  A majority of 56% of the 
students did not know that the average American household 
generates about 15 lbs. of hazardous household wastes each year.  
A majority of 76% of the students did not know that the average 
American home contains about 8 gallons of hazardous liquids.  A 
majority of 51% of the students did not know that only 5% of all 
American households dispose of household hazardous wastes 
properly.  A majority of 62% of the students did not know that 
55% of all household hazardous waste in American is made up of 
house maintenance items.  A majority of 60% of the students did 
not know that 11% of all household hazardous waste in American 
is made up of automotive items.  A majority of 89% of the 
students thought that people who dispose of household hazardous 
waste in an illegal or unecological ways should be fined or 
imprisoned.  A majority of 88% of the students knew that used 
motor oil should not be poured down the sewer.  A majority of 
53% of the students knew that batteries should not be put in the 
garbage.  A majority of 71% of the students knew that one liter 
of used motor oil can contaminate two million liters of drinking 
water.  A majority of 58% of the students knew that the best 
ways to control household hazardous waste is to buy only the 
amount you need, give excess to other people to use, use a 
nonhazardous substitute, and to dispose of them properly or 
recycle them.  A majority of 53% of the students did not have 
the telephone number for the poison control center clearly 
posted at home in case of an emergency.  A majority of 69% of 
the students thought that they know how to properly dispose of 
hazardous household wastes.  A majority of 82% of the students 
know that household hazardous materials include explosive 
materials, corrosive materials, toxic materials, infectious 
materials, and radioactive materials.  A majority of 57% of the 
students know that a legally hazardous household waste is a 
discarded substance who's chemical or biological nature makes it 
potentially dangerous to people.  A majority of 82% of the 
students knew that storing flammable liquids in glass bottles is 
dangerous.  A majority of 56% of the students knew that storing 
bleach and ammonia in glass bottles is not a good idea.  Half of 
the students reported that their community had a household 
hazardous waste disposal or recycling program.  A majority of 
96% of the students knew that improper disposal of household 
hazardous waste can pollute the ground and water.  A majority of 
99% of the students agreed that household hazardous waste should 
be clearly labeled.  All of the students agreed that household 
hazardous wastes should have directions for proper disposal on 
the container.

IV.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:

A majority of students believe that household hazardous waste 
should be disposed of properly and recycled, but half of them 
report no community program for the disposal of or recycling of 
household hazardous waste.  Almost half of the responses to the 
factual questions were inaccurate yet the majority of the 
students thought that they knew how to properly dispose of or 
recycle household hazardous waste.  These findings indicate a 
need for community disposal, recycling, and education programs.  
A majority of 57% of the responses to the factual questions were 
answered correctly on the questionnaire.  Therefore, we accept 
our hypothesis which stated that the majority of the responses 
to the factual questions on our questionnaire will be correct.

V.  APPLICATION:

We can apply our findings to the community by encouraging the 
City Council to develop a community disposal and recycling 
program for household hazardous waste.  We will also design a 
container for people to put their household hazardous waste in 
for collection by the new community program.  Finally, we will 
produce an instructional video that will inform people about 
which household products are hazardous and how to properly 
dispose of or recycle them.



Title:  A Student Survey About Iraq

Student Researcher:  Matt Naides
School:  Weber Elementary
         Iowa City, Iowa
Grade:  6
Teacher:  Chris Rohret

I.  Statement of Purpose and Hypothesis:

I wanted to find out if the students at Weber Elementary knew 
about Iraq and the recent crisis that was taking place.  I also 
wanted to know their opinions about Iraq.  My hypothesis stated 
that a majority of the students wouldn't know about Iraq and the 
crisis with Iraq.  Of the people that did know about Iraq, there 
would be a negative attitude toward Iraq.

II.  Methodology:

First, I reviewed literature on Iraq including news articles and 
magazines.  Then I developed my hypothesis.  Then I wrote my 
questionnaire and picked a stratified random sample group of 80 
people, 40 people from grades 3 and 4, and 40 from grades 5 and 
6.  Next, I tallied up the results, created the graphs, wrote my 
abstract and published it.

III.  Analysis of Data:

Sixty-six people responded to my survey.  Out of those people, 
17% did know about Iraq and the crisis with Iraq, and 83% 
didn't.  Out of the people that answered the questions properly, 
15% thought that we should trust Iraq to keep its end of the 
deal concerning weapons inspections, 62% thought that we 
shouldn't, and 23% were undecided.  Out of the people that 
answered the questions correctly, 77% thought that we should 
"remove" Iraq's leader from office, 8% thought that we 
shouldn't, and 15% were undecided.  Of the people that correctly 
answered the questions, nobody thought that we should remove our 
military forces from the area, 92% thought that we shouldn't, 
and 8% were undecided.

IV.  Summary and Conclusion:

I found out that a majority of the people in grades 3 through 6 
at Weber Elementary don't know about Iraq and the most recent 
crisis with Iraq.  The few who did know have a negative attitude 
towards Iraq and its leader. Thus, I accept my hypothesis.  If I 
were to do another survey about Iraq and the crisis with Iraq, I 
would also survey the teachers.

V.  Application:

I think that Weber Elementary should place more emphasis on 
world affairs due to the fact that my survey shows a lack of 
knowledge about them, such as Iraq and the crisis with Iraq.



TITLE:  A Survey About Pet Ownership

STUDENT RESEARCHER:  Alison Wilder
SCHOOL ADDRESS:  Irving B. Weber Elementary School
                 Iowa City, Iowa
GRADE:  5
TEACHER:  Chris Rohret

I.  STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS

I wanted to know if there was a correlation between the number 
of pets that students at Weber Elementary School have and the 
amount of time their family is at home.  My hypothesis stated 
that the students' families would be home more if they had more 
pets.  I had another thought that maybe if they weren't home a 
lot, they would have a pet that was more independent. 

II.  METHODOLOGY

I read the articles I had collected about pets.  Then I 
developed my hypothesis and statement of purpose.  I wrote the 
questionnaire, figured a stratified random sample population of 
50% each of Team 3 (3rd and 4th grade) and Team 4 (5th and 6th 
grade), and distributed the questionnaires to them.  Then I 
collected the questionnaires, tallied the results, and completed 
my abstract.

III.  ANALYSIS OF DATA

I found that the number of pets that the students have has 
nothing to do with the time that they're at home.  Seventy-three 
percent of the students surveyed had pets. Thirty-three percent 
of the students had one pet and 31% of the students had two 
pets.  A surprising number of students (17%) had five or more 
pets; that percentage was higher than the students having three 
or four pets. 

Twenty-five percent of the students didn't know how much time in 
a day their family was home.  Of those who did, 16% were home 11 
to 14 hours a day.  Nearly all (86%) of the students felt that 
their pets got enough attention. Six percent felt that the pets 
didn't get enough attention and 8% of the students were unsure.  
The pets that were the most popular were fish, followed by cats, 
and then dogs. 

IV.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

The amount of time that the students' families are home does not 
affect the number of pets they have.  I also found no 
correlation between pet independence and the time students' 
families are at home.  Therefore, I reject my hypothesis.  I 
think if I were to do another survey about pets, I would ask: 
Why did you get your pet(s)?  I would also use multiple choice 
questions. 

V.  APPLICATION

I think that my findings about pets and how much care they need 
will help people decide what kind of pet to get. 



TITLE:   What Do Students Know And Feel About Prejudice?

STUDENT RESEARCHER: Matt Kubicek and Whitney Stoppel  
SCHOOL:  Mandeville Middle School
         Mandeville, Louisiana
GRADE:  6
TEACHER:  John I. Swang, Ph.D.

I.  STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS: 

We would like to do a survey research project on what students 
know and feel about prejudice.  Our hypothesis states that the 
majority of the responses to the factual questions on our 
questionnaire about prejudice will be answered correctly.

II.  METHODOLOGY:

First, we chose our topic.  Next, we wrote our statement of 
purpose.  Then we composed our review of literature about 
prejudice, discrimination, apartheid, KKK, white supremacy 
groups, genocide, civil rights, segregation, racism, anti-
semetism, sexism, ageism, bias, intolerance, and hatred.  

Next, we developed our hypothesis and wrote our methodology to 
test it.  Then we developed our questionnaire about prejudice.  
Then we drew a random sample of 26 sixth grade students at 
Mandeville Middle School in Mandeville, Louisiana.  We gave our 
questionnaire to them.  We also sent our questionnaire out over 
NSRC's electronic school district on the Internet to a non-
random sample of students from all over the world.  When the 
completed questionnaires were returned we scored them.  Then we 
conducted our analysis of data using simple statistics, charts, 
and graphs.  Next, we wrote our summary and conclusion.  
Finally, we applied our findings to the world outside our 
classroom.   

III.  ANALYSIS OF DATA:

A majority of 92% of the students we surveyed knew that 
prejudice is a hostile and negative attitude towards someone.  A 
majority of 58% of the students we surveyed knew that 
discrimination is an unjustified negative and harmful action.  A 
majority of 75% of the students we surveyed did not know that 
racial segregation sanctioned by law and widely practiced in 
South Africa was called apartheid.  A majority of 92% of the 
students we surveyed did not know that anti-Semitism is the 
prejudice against Jews.  All of the students we surveyed did not 
know that at age 5-6 children's attitudes, values, and beliefs 
which lead to prejudice are learned.  A majority of 58% of the 
students we surveyed knew that Nathan B. Forest started the KKK.  
A majority of 75% of the students we surveyed knew that The 
Americans with Disabilities Act provided handicapped people 
protection under the law from discrimination.  None of the 
students we surveyed knew that bias is to treat others in a 
prejudicial way.  A majority of 75% of the students we surveyed 
did not know that segregation is the separation of some people 
within a society from others.  A majority of 92% of the students 
we surveyed knew that racism is the belief that a certain race 
is better than another.  A majority of 75% of the students we 
surveyed knew that ageism is the belief that a certain age is 
better than another.  A majority of 83% of the students we 
surveyed knew that stereotypes are the belief that all 
individuals of a race or group are the same.  A majority of 83% 
of the students we surveyed knew that the Civil Rights 
guarantees freedom, justice, and equality to all people no 
matter what their race, religion, gender, or other 
characteristic unrelated to the worth of the individual is.  A 
majority of 64% of the students we surveyed knew that biological 
differences, rapid social change, historical beliefs, and 
cultural differences all cause racism.  A majority of 73% of the 
students we surveyed knew that sexism is the prejudice against a 
different gender.  A majority of 58% of the students we surveyed 
knew that genocide is the rapid killing of a certain race or 
group.  A majority of 73% of the students we surveyed did not 
think that everyone has prejudices.  A majority of 67% of the 
students we surveyed knew that white supremacy groups are active 
now in the United States of America.  

A majority of 58% of the students we surveyed thought that they 
did not have prejudices.  

IV.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:

A small majority of 58% of the factual questions on our 
questionnaire about prejudice were answered correctly.  We 
accept our hypothesis which stated  that the majority of the 
responses to the factual questions on our questionnaire about 
prejudice will be answered correctly.  It should be noted that 
almost half (42%) of the responses to the factual questions were 
answered incorrectly.  This shows a significant lack of 
awareness about this important social problem today. 

V.  APPLICATION:

We can apply our findings by informing the government and 
schools that more about prejudice in all its forms needs to be 
taught in school.



TITLE:  What Students Know And Feel About Water Pollution?

STUDENT RESEARCHERS:  John Casey and Jane Bordelon
SCHOOL:  Mandeville Middle School
         Mandeville, Louisiana
GRADE:  6
TEACHER:  John I. Swang, Ph.D.

I.  STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS: 

We would like to do a survey research project on what students 
know and feel about water pollution.  Our hypothesis states that 
the majority of the responses to the factual questions in our 
questionnaire will be correct.

II.  METHODOLOGY:

First, we chose a topic.  Then we wrote our statement of 
purpose.  Next, we gathered our information and composed a 
review of literature about pollution and water pollution.  After 
that we wrote our bibliography and developed a hypothesis. Then 
we wrote a methodology to test the hypothesis and developed a 
questionnaire about water pollution.  Then we sent out our 
questionnaire to 26 randomly chosen sixth grade students from 
Mandeville Middle School in Mandeville, Louisiana.  Then we sent 
our questionnaire out on the Internet to students all over the 
world.  When the questionnaires were returned, we tallied the 
responses and recorded the results on our data collection form.  
Next, we conducted our analysis of data and wrote our summary 
and conclusion.  Finally, we applied our findings to the world 
outside the classroom.

III.  ANALYSIS OF DATA:

A majority of 60% of the students we surveyed knew that 
pollution is the contamination of the environment which 
interferes with human health, the quality of life, and the 
natural functioning of ecosystems.  A majority of 60% knew that 
water pollution is foreign matter deteriorating the quality of 
water and rendering it unfit for it's intended uses.  A majority 
of 75% did not know that eutrophication is the process in which 
nutrients such as fertilizers, phosphates, etc. enter the water 
and cause abnormal plant growth.  A majority of 60% didn't know 
that about 60 gallons of water in the U.S. are polluted each day 
per person by activities such as bathing, food preparation, body 
elimination, and recreation.  A majority of 56% percent didn't 
know that the purpose of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act 
was to establish stringent controls and cleanup deadlines for 
industrial and municipal pollution.  Half of the students we 
surveyed knew that the major sources of water pollution are 
sewage, agricultural runoff, and industrial wastes.  A majority 
of 56% knew that 40% of the ground water in the United States is 
polluted.  A majority of 66% knew that one frequently found 
metal in polluted water is lead.  A majority of 55% knew that 
human diseases, destruction of aquatic plants and animals, and 
eutrophication are effects of water pollution.  None of the 
students we surveyed knew that heat is considered a water 
pollutant.  A majority of 88% knew that about one ton out of 
every million tons of oil shipped is spilled and pollutes the 
oceans and seas.  A majority of 56% didn't know that most water 
pollution problems occur in coastal regions.  A majority of 66% 
knew that nitrates in drinking water can cause a disease in 
infants that sometimes results in death.  A majority of 56% knew 
that wastes that are discharged directly into U.S. marine waters 
are estimated to exceed 30 million metric tons per year.  A 
majority of 55% knew that pharmaceutical water pollution happens 
when patients excrete prescription drugs and they enter the 
sewage systems untreated, eventually reaching our drinking 
water.  A majority of 66% knew that about 75% of the world's 
rural population and 20% of it's urban population have no ready 
access to uncontaminated water.  A majority of 88% knew that 
acid rain is a major pollutant of water.  A majority of 77% did 
not think that water pollution is a serious problem in their 
community.  A majority of 55% said that they could not swim in 
the bodies of water in their community because they are 
polluted.  A majority of 77% said that they drink tap water from 
the faucets in their house.  A majority of 77% said that their 
families don't filter tap water for drinking and cooking.

IV.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:

A small majority of 53% of the responses to the factual 
questions on our questionnaire were correct.  Therefore, we 
accept our hypothesis which stated that the majority of the 
responses to the factual questions in our questionnaire would be 
correct.  A majority the students did not think that water 
pollution is a serious problem in their community.  A majority 
said that they could not swim in the bodies of water in their 
community because they are polluted, that they drink tap water 
from the faucets in their house, and that their families don't 
filter tap water for drinking and cooking.

V.  APPLICATION:

We can apply our findings by informing students at our school 
about the amount of water pollution in our community and the 
effect it has on their lives and health.



TITLE:  What Do Students Know And Feel About Saddam Hussein And 
        Iraq?

STUDENT RESEARCHERS:  James Rees and Amber French
SCHOOL:  Mandeville Middle School
         Mandeville, Louisiana
GRADE:  6
TEACHER:  John I. Swang, Ph.D.

I.  STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND HYPOTHESIS:

We would like to do a survey research project on what students 
know and feel about Saddam Hussein.  Our hypothesis states that 
the majority of the responses to the factual questions will be 
answered correctly.   

II.  METHODOLOGY:

First, we decided on our topic.  Next, we wrote our statement of 
purpose.  Then we wrote a review of literature about Iraq, 
Saddam Hussein, Weapons Of Mass Destruction, and the Gulf War.  
Next, we developed our hypothesis.  

Then we developed a questionnaire about the country of Iraq and 
Saddam Hussein.  After that we passed out our survey to 26 
randomly chosen sixth grade students from MMS.  Next, we put the 
questionnaire out on the Internet for students to respond to 
from around the world.  

After the questionnaires were returned, we scored them.  Then we 
analyzed our data, accepted/rejected our hypothesis, and wrote 
our summary and conclusion.  Finally, we applied our findings to 
the world outside the classroom.    
 
III.  ANALYSIS OF DATA:

A majority of 79% of the students surveyed did not know that the 
Iraqi form of government is a republic.  A majority of 77% felt 
that the United States should pressure the UN to continue the 
embargo against Iraq.  A majority of 68% did not think that it 
is fair for the embargo to continue while many Iraqi children 
suffer and die from malnutrition and childhood diseases which 
could be prevented.  A majority of 74% knew that Iraq is located 
in Asia.  A majority of 92% did not know that Saddam Hussein is 
a president.  A majority of 79% of the students surveyed knew 
that 95% of Iraq's population is Arab.  A majority of 67% 
thought that Saddam Hussein should fully cooperate with the UN's 
inspectors looking for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.  A 
majority of 71% thought that the UN should allow Iraq to sell 
more of it's oil so that Iraq can buy much needed food and 
medicine for its people.  A majority of 55% did not know that 
Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990.  A majority of 71% did not know 
that Iraq's population is about 21,430,000.  A majority of 67% 
did not think that Saddam Hussein is a great world leader.  A 
majority of 67% knew that the current crises between Iraq and 
the UN involves not allowing UN inspectors to search for weapons 
of mass destruction.  A majority of 58% agreed that the USA and 
its Allies should attack Iraq if it does not fully comply with 
the UN's search for weapons of mass destruction.

A small majority of 54% of the total responses to the factual 
questions were answered incorrectly.

IV.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:

We have found that a majority of 54% of the responses to the 
factual questions were incorrect.  Therefore, we reject our 
hypothesis which states that the majority of the responses to 
the factual questions will be answered correctly.  We have found 
that the majority of the students felt that Saddam Hussein 
should be forced to give up his weapons of mass destruction.  We 
found out that students felt that we should allow Iraq to sell 
more of its oil to buy much needed food and medicine for its 
people. We also found that a majority of the students did not 
know much about Iraq and Saddam Hussein.

V.  APPLICATION:

We can apply our findings to the world outside the classroom by 
informing Congress that a small majority of the sixth grade 
students at our school thought that we should use military 
action if Saddam Hussein does not comply with the UN inspectors 
looking for weapons of mass destruction.  We can also tell the 
teachers to inform their students more about world conflicts and 
global issues such as the Iraqi problem. the loved ones around 
them.

© 1998 John I. Swang, Ph.D.



Search for more science fair projects
Search science fair projects Browse science fair projects
or Ask the Mad Scientist for help with your Science Project

All Science Fair Projects