All Science Fair Projects

Over 1000 FREE Science Fair Project Ideas!

If you appreciate ingenuity, simplicity, and like instant gratification from your radio projects, then you ought to spend a few minutes building your own foxhole radio. Foxhole radios were built by GIs in World War II from materials they had easy access to in the field. They usually consist of just a coil and a detector. They use a point detector, the chief component being an ordinary razo
Difficulty: Elementary school
The purpose of this experiment was to find out which materials block radio waves and thus cause the most interference for remote control devices. The information gained from this experiment will help if someone is using remote control robotics or devices. It may be useful for scientific reasons, remote exploration as well as recreation. This experiment will benefit all those by determining which m
Difficulty: Elementary school
This is an AC electric generator which is capable of lighting up a tiny incandescent light bulb. The generator is made up of a hollow-ended cardboard box with a nail through the center, many turns of copper wire wound around the box, and four larger magnets clamped around the nail. When the nail and magnets are spun fast by hand, the little light bulb lights up dimly.
Difficulty: Middle school
The simplest wireless telegraph set consists of a means of generating and controlling a spark which sends out radio waves into the air, and a receiver or detector to detect the radio waves. Probably the simplest way to generate and control a spark is to use a switch (called a telegraph key) to turn on and off a buzzer which generates sparks. The simplest way to receive or detect the radio waves ge
Difficulty: High school
Lightning is beautiful, dangerous, and mysterious. The same brilliant flashes that inspire poetry and paintings can cause city-wide power outages and raging forest fires. Try this easy experiment to make your own miniature version of a lightning bolt.
Difficulty: Middle school
Iron filings align themselves in strong magnetic fields. This reveals the shape of the field patterns. A similar thing happens with the electric fields created by high voltage and by "static electricity." If small fibers are exposed to a very strong electric or magnetic field, they will align with the field and make it visible.
Difficulty: Elementary school
I think that if the solar cell is placed perpendicular to the sun's rays, the power going to the cell will be maximized.
Difficulty: Middle school
The magnetic field around a permanent magnet, like the gravitational field around a massive object, is not only invisible, but hard for students to comprehend. With no concrete experience to draw from, they tend to ignore this basic concept, or at best, memorize facts about it. This activity shows how to map a magnetic field, and to find how a bar magnet's field combines with the Earth's magnetic
Difficulty: Elementary school
Perform various experiments to determine the factors that affect the strength of an electromagnet. For example, you can vary the number of coils of wire around the core, or vary the material of the core.
Difficulty: High school
This simple experiment shows you how to demonstrate magnetic shielding and explains how it works.
Difficulty: Elementary school
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